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By Jie Chen

What sort of position can the center classification play in power democratization in such an undemocratic, past due constructing kingdom as China? to reply to this profound political in addition to theoretical query, Jie Chen explores attitudinal and behavioral orientation of China's new center category to democracy and democratization. Chen's paintings relies on a special set of information amassed from a probability-sample survey and in-depth interviews of citizens in 3 significant chinese language towns, Beijing, Chengdu and Xi'an--each of which represents a unique point of monetary improvement in city China-in 2007 and 2008. The empirical findings derived from this knowledge set ensure that (1) in comparison to different social periods, fairly decrease sessions, the hot chinese language heart class-especially these hired within the kingdom apparatus-tends to be extra supportive of the present Party-state yet much less supportive of democratic values and associations; (2) the hot center class's attitudes towards democracy could be accounted for by means of this class's shut ideational and institutional ties with the nation, and its perceived socioeconomic well being, between different elements; (3) the inability of aid for democracy one of the center classification has a tendency to reason this social category to behave in want of the present country yet against democratic adjustments.

crucial political implication is that whereas China's center category isn't really more likely to function the harbinger of democracy now, its present attitudes towards democracy could swap sooner or later. this sort of an important shift within the heart class's orientation towards democracy can happen, specifically whilst its dependence at the Party-state decreases and belief of its personal social and fiscal statuses turns pessimistic. the major theoretical implication from the findings means that the attitudinal and behavioral orientations of the center class-as a complete and as a part-toward democratic swap in overdue constructing nations are contingent upon its dating with the incumbent kingdom and its perceived social/economic health, and the center class's aid for democracy in those international locations is much from inevitable.

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Additional resources for A Middle Class Without Democracy: Economic Growth and the Prospects for Democratization in China

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I then discuss crucial political implications from these findings for the role of middle class in democratization in China and important theoretical implications for such a role in the developing world. 2 China’s Middle Class: Definition and Evolution BEFORE ANALYZING THE political orientations of China’s new middle class, I first need to conceptualize and identify this social class and describe its unique relationship with the party-state. Who are the middle class by modern standards in contemporary China?

IV. Data The data used in this study came from a probability-sample survey and a set of in-depth interviews (see Appendix), both of which were conducted in three Chinese cities, Beijing, Chengdu, and Xi’an, in INTRODUCTION 21 late 2007 and early 2008. The general sociopolitical environment in China in the middle of the first decade of the twenty-first century when this survey was conducted can be characterized by several salient developments. They include the adoption of populist policies by the fourth generation of the CCP leadership under Hu Jintao to “build a harmonious society” (goujian hexie shehui) to quell dissatisfaction over worsening socioeconomic inequality and rampant official corruption; the central government’s increased legal and constitutional protection for private property, which orthodox Marxism claimed was supposed to be eventually eliminated; and the party-state’s stepped-up political repression for the sake of social stability while increasing economic freedom for private entrepreneurs, as well as ordinary citizens.

They include the adoption of populist policies by the fourth generation of the CCP leadership under Hu Jintao to “build a harmonious society” (goujian hexie shehui) to quell dissatisfaction over worsening socioeconomic inequality and rampant official corruption; the central government’s increased legal and constitutional protection for private property, which orthodox Marxism claimed was supposed to be eventually eliminated; and the party-state’s stepped-up political repression for the sake of social stability while increasing economic freedom for private entrepreneurs, as well as ordinary citizens.

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